Marine Le Pen: We reap what we sow

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photo. Wikimedia CommonsAccording to a poll conducted by the Elabe institute, if Marine Le Pen faced Emmanuel Macron in the second round of the presidential election today, she would win 55 percent of the vote. votes, and the current president 45 percent. In the last presidential election in 2022, Macron won with 58 percent of the vote. support against 42 percent. for LePen. Since June last year, the RN has been the leading opposition group in the National Assembly with 89 deputies. “We reap what we sow,” Le Pen said in an interview with the Spanish daily “El Pais”, recalling that her group had already drawn attention to the problems a year ago which France is currently facing. Marine Le Pen stressed that her party was slowly but steadily gaining the trust of the French. Although there are still four years left until the elections, Le Pen feels closer to power than ever. She believes she has finally managed to undemonize her party. That is to get it out of the corner of the “ideological contagion” and make its program acceptable to a large part of the French. “In a few years we went from being the most hated party in France to being the most loved party (…) I am the proud leader of the largest European party right wing,” says Le Pen. “We have never been on the extreme right,” she claims, noting that her National Union, contrary to popular belief reinforced by the campaign against the RN, does not reject parliamentarism and pluralism and does not advocate the use of violence. Le Pen goes even further: “We are not right wing. (…) We are citizens. I believe that the nation is the political heart of our project.” Yet the core values ​​of Le Pen and the RN have not changed. One of them is nationalism: while he praises Macron for distancing himself from the United States and its policy towards China, he criticizes him for the reason he is guided in this matter, which is “European sovereignty.” “For there to be sovereignty, you need a nation, and there is no such thing as a nation of Europeans.” Marine Le Pen does not like comparisons to Italian Prime Minister Giorgia Meloni, who seized power with pro-NATO and pro-EU slogans. “I am still a Eurosceptic. More and more with each passing day.” “I am not skeptical of Europe,” she clarifies, but “of the political organization of Europe.” For years, Le Pen has been the French politician closest to Putin’s Russia. Her party received a loan of 9 million euros from a Russian bank in 2014 and declared that it shares Russia’s global vision. Following the invasion of Ukraine in February 2022, Le Pen distanced herself from her earlier statements. “I believe in the sovereignty of nations: if Ukraine wants to join NATO, if that’s what it wants, I don’t see anyone who could oppose it,” he declares. “When a nation like Russia attacks another nation and threatens its sovereignty, you have to take a stand.” However, he also does not see a good way out of the current situation. “If Russia wins the war, it will be a disaster because all countries with a territorial conflict will think they can resolve it militarily,” he argues. “If Ukraine wins, it will mean that NATO has entered the war, because I am convinced that without NATO strength, Ukraine cannot defeat Russia militarily. And that means that World War III will be unleashed.” The third option could be just as dramatic: “If we continue to drop weapons on Ukraine as we are doing now, we will face a new hundred-year war, which, taking into account the human losses, is a terrible drama.” However, Le Pen supports sending weapons to Ukraine but opposes their offensive use. The second unchanging foundation of Lepenism is the rejection of immigration, and here the RN leader congratulates herself on achieving a “complete ideological victory” because she believes other parties have embraced her ideas. “Today,” says Marine Le Pen, “even the Communist Party says borders are needed.” But Le Pen is not limited to the return of border controls. If he comes to power, he promises to organize a referendum on the introduction of the so-called national preferences that would give French people priority over foreigners in access to work, housing and social benefits. “For me, the referendum must be an integral part of the functioning of French democracy. I am considering holding at least one major referendum a year.” Le Pen also criticizes the legislative process that led to the adoption of the pension reform. “What can be done to prevent people from thinking there is a problem with democracy?” he asks. “Emmanuel Macron is a growth hormone for those who no longer believe in democracy.” Referring to the risk of an authoritarian drift if he comes to power, he replies: “On the contrary, if I am elected, there will be more democracy.” Here she recalls her plans for annual referendums, elections in the proportional system and a desire to give parliament a greater role. Le Pen believes that voters have so far only known her caricature created by the media. But she says it works out for her in the end. “Our MPs were spoken of as incompetent morons. (…) It was so offensive that when the French saw the intelligent, hard-working, well-dressed MPs arriving, they said to themselves: ‘But these people are very far from the portrait they have painted for us.’ The RN leader maintains, “When we come to power, people will see that not only is this not an apocalypse, but that our policies are common sense policies.” Source: EL PAIS.

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